Programming Language Design Concepts (Paperback)

David A. Watt

  • 出版商: Wiley
  • 出版日期: 2004-05-21
  • 售價: $3,290
  • 貴賓價: 9.5$3,126
  • 語言: 英文
  • 頁數: 492
  • 裝訂: Paperback
  • ISBN: 0470853204
  • ISBN-13: 9780470853207
  • 相關分類: C++ 程式語言Java 程式語言Perl 程式語言
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Description:

Programming languages exist to communicate with computers and also with people. A good language, like a good mathematical notation, helps us to formulate and communicate ideas more quickly. Yet there are many programming languages and many features to understand in each.

Reflecting current trends where object-oriented (OO) programming has taken over from imperative programming as the dominant paradigm, this book gives greatest prominence to the OO paradigm using Java and C++ as the main exemplar languages. Similarly, since the Web has revolutionized the computing industry, the need for examination of scripting languages, such as Perl and Python, has risen. With additional case study languages including Python, Haskell, Prolog and Ada, Programming Language Design Concepts deepens study by examining the motivation of programming languages rather than just their features. ,P.All programmers, not just language specialists, need a thorough understanding of language concepts in order to get the best of these most fundamental tools. This book explains the basic concepts that underpin all programming languages, and shows how these concepts are synthesized in the major paradigms: imperative, object-oriented, concurrent, functional, logic and scripting.

Written in a clear, approachable style, ideal for classroom and self-study, the book includes numerous examples, case studies of several major programming languages, and end-of-chapter exercises. Sample solutions to exercises are available on the companion website. Companion website: www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/~daw/books/PLDC/

Table of Contents:

Preface.

PART I: INTRODUCTION.

1. Programming Languages.

1.1 Programming linguistics.

1.1.1 Concepts and paradigms.

1.1.2 Syntax, semantics, and pragmatics.

1.1.3 Language processors.

1.2 Historical development.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises.

PART II: BASIC CONCEPTS

2. Values and Types.

2.1 Types.

2.2 Primitive types.

2.2.1 Built-in primitive types.

2.2.2 Defined primitive types.

2.2.3 Discrete primitive types.

2.3 Composite types.

2.3.1 Cartesian products, structures, and records.

2.3.2 Mappings, arrays, and functions.

2.3.3 Disjoint unions, discriminated records, and objects.

2.4 Recursive types.

2.4.1 Lists.

2.4.2 Strings.

2.4.3 Recursive types in general.

2.5 Type systems.

2.5.1 Static vs dynamic typing.

2.5.2 Type equivalence.

2.5.3 The Type Completeness Principle.

2.6 Expressions.

2.6.1 Literals.

2. 6.2 Constructions.

2.6.3 Function calls.

2.6.4 Conditional expressions.

2.6.5 Iterative expressions.

2.6.6 Constant and variable accesses.

2.7 Implementation notes.

2.7.1 Representation of primitive types.

2.7.2 Representation of Cartesian products.

2.7.3 Representation of arrays.

2.7.4 Representation of disjoint unions.

2.7.5 Representation of recursive types.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises.

3. Variables and Storage.

3.1 Variables and storage.

3.2 Simple variables.

3.3 Composite variables.

3.3.1 Total vs selective update.

3.3.2 Static vs dynamic vs flexible arrays.

3.4 Copy semantics vs reference semantics.

3.5 Lifetime.

3.5.1 Global and local variables.

3.5.2 Heap variables.

3.5.3 Persistent variables.

3.6 Pointers.

3.6.1 Pointers and recursive types.

3.6.2 Dangling pointers.

3.7 Commands.

3.7.1 Skips.

3.7.2 Assignments.

3.7.3 Procedure calls.

3.7.4 Sequential commands.

3.7.5 Collateral commands.

3.7.6 Conditional commands.

3.7.7 Iterative commands.

3.8 Expressions with side effects.

3.8.1 Command expressions.

3.8.2 Expression-oriented languages.

3.9 Implementation notes

3.9.1 Storage for global and local variables.

3.9.2 Storage for heap variables.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises.

4. Bindings and Scope.

4.1 Bindings and environments.

4.2 Scope.

4.2.1 Block structure.

4.2.2 Scope and visibility.

4.2.3 Static vs dynamic scoping.

4.3 Declarations.

4.3.1 Type declarations.

4.3.2 Constant declarations.

4.3.3 Variable declarations.

4.3.4 Procedure definitions.

4.3.5 Collateral declarations.

4.3.6 Sequential declarations.

4.3.6 Recursive declarations.

4.3.8 Scopes of declarations.

4.4 Blocks.

4.4.1 Block commands.

4.4.2 Block expressions.

4.4.3 The Qualification Principle.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises.

5. Procedural Abstraction.

5.1 Function procedures and proper procedures.

5.1.1 Function procedures.

5.1.2 Proper procedures

5.1.3 The Abstraction Principle.

5.2 Parameters and arguments.

5.2.1 Copy parameter mechanisms.

5.2.2 Reference parameter mechanisms.

5.2.3 The Correspondence Principle.

5.3 Implementation notes

5.3.1 Implementation of procedure calls.

5.3.1 Implementation of parameter passing.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises.

PART III: ADVANCED CONCEPTS.

6. Data Abstraction.

6.1 Program units, packages, and encapsulation.

6.1.1 Packages.

6.1.2 Encapsulation.

6.2 Abstract types.

6.3 Objects and classes.

6.3.1 Classes.

6.3.2 Subclasses and inheritance.

6.3.3 Abstract classes.

6.3.4. Single vs multiple inheritance.

6.3.5 Interfaces.

6.4 Implementation notes.

6.4.1 Representation of objects

6.4.2 Implementation of method calls.

Summary.

Further reading

Exercises.

7. Generic Abstraction.

7.1 Generic units and instantiation.

7.1.1 Generic packages in ADA.

7.1.2 Generic classes in C++.

7.2 Type and class parameters.

7.2.1 Type parameters in ADA.

7.2.2 Type parameters in C++.

7.2.3 Class parameters in JAVA.

7.3 Implementation notes

7.3.1 Implementation of ADA generic units.

7.3.2 Implementation of C++ generic units.

7.3.3 Implementation of JAVA generic units.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises

8. Type Systems.

8.1 Inclusion polymorphism.

8.1.1 Types and subtypes.

8.1.2 Classes and subclasses.

8.2 Parametric polymorphism.

8.2.1 Polymorphic procedures.

8.2.2 Parameterized types.

8.2.3 Type inference.

8.3 Overloading.

8.4 Type conversions.

8.5 Implementation notes

8.5.1 Implementation of polymorphic procedures.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises.

9. Control Flow.

9.1 Sequencers.

9.2 Jumps.

9.3 Escapes.

9.4 Exceptions.

9.5 Implementation notes

9.5.1 Implementation of jumps and escapes.

9.5.2 Implementation of exceptions.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises.

10. Concurrency (by William Findlay).

10.1 Why concurrency?.

10.2 Programs and processes.

10.3 Problems with concurrency.

10.3.1 Nondeterminism.

10.3.2 Speed dependence.

10.3.3 Deadlock.

10.3.4 Starvation.

10.4 Process interactions.

10.4.1 Independent processes.

10.4.2 Competing processes.

10.4.3 Communicating processes.

10.5 Concurrency primitives.

10.5.1 Process creation and control.

10.5.2 Interrupts.

10.5.3 Spin locks and wait-free algorithms.

10.5.4 Events.

10.5.5 Semaphores.

10.5.6 Messages.

10.5.7 Remote procedure calls.

10.6 Concurrent control abstractions.

10.6.1 Conditional critical regions.

10.6.2 Monitors.

10.6.3 Rendezvous.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises.

PART IV: PARADIGMS

11. Imperative Programming.

11.1 Key concepts.

11.2 Pragmatics.

11.2.1 A simple spellchecker.

11.3 Case study: C.

11.3.1 Values and types.

11.3.2 Variables, storage, and control.

11.3.3 Bindings and scope.

11.3.4 Procedural abstraction.

11.3.5 Independent compilation.

11.3.6 Preprocessor directives.

11.3.7 Function library.

11.3.8 A simple spellchecker.

11.4 Case study: ADA.

11.4.1 Values and types.

11.4.2 Variables, storage, and control.

11.4.3 Bindings and scope.

11.4.4 Procedural abstraction.

11.4.5 Data abstraction.

11.4.6 Generic abstraction.

11.4.7 Separate compilation.

11.4.8 Package library.

11.4.9 A simple spellchecker.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises.

12. Object-Oriented Programming.

12.1 Key Concepts.

12.2 Pragmatics.

12.3 Case study: C++.

12.3.1 Values and types.

12.3.2 Variables, storage, and control.

12.3.3 Bindings and scope.

12.3.4 Procedural abstraction.

12.3.5 Data abstraction.

12.3.6 Generic abstraction.

12.3.7 Independent compilation and preprocessor directives

12.3.8 Class and template library.

12.3.9 A simple spellchecker.

12.4 Case study: JAVA.

12.4.1 Values and types.

12.4.2 Variables, storage, and control.

12.4.3 Bindings and scope.

12.4.4 Procedural abstraction.

12.4.5 Data abstraction.

12.4.6 Generic abstraction.

12.4.7 Separate compilation and dynamic linking.

12.4.8 Class library.

12.4.9 A simple spellchecker.

12.5 Case study: ADA95.

12.5.1 Types.

12.5.2 Data abstraction.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises.

13. Concurrent Programming (by William Findlay).

13.1 Key concepts.

13.2 Pragmatics.

13.3 Case study: ADA95.

13.3.1 Process creation and termination.

13.3.2 Mutual exclusion.

13.3.3 Admission control.

13.3.4 Scheduling away deadlock.

13.4 Case study: JAVA.

13.4.1 Process creation and termination.

13.4.2 Mutual exclusion.

13.4.3 Admission control.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises.

14. Functional Programming.

14.1 Key concepts.

14.1.1 Eager vs normal-order vs lazy evaluation.

14.2 Pragmatics.

14.3 Case study: HASKELL.

14.3.1 Values and types.

14.3.2 Bindings and scope.

14.3.3 Procedural abstraction.

14.3.4 Lazy evaluation.

14.3.5 Data abstraction.

14.3.6 Generic abstraction.

14.3.7 Modeling state.

14.3.8 A simple spellchecker.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises.

15. Logic Programming.

15.1 Key concepts.

15.2 Pragmatics.

15.3 Case study: PROLOG.

15.3.1 Values, variables, and terms.

15.3.2 Assertions and clauses.

15.3.3 Relations.

15.3.4 The closed-world assumption.

15.3.5 Bindings and scope.

15.3.6 Control.

15.3.7 Input/output.

15.3.8 A simple spellchecker.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises

16. Scripting.

16.1 Pragmatics.

16.1.1 Regular expressions.

16.2 Case study: PYTHON.

16.2.1 Values and types.

16.2.2 Variables, storage, and control

16.2.3 Bindings and scope.

16.2.4 Procedural abstraction.

16.2.5 Data abstraction.

16.2.6 Separate compilation

16.2.7 Module library.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises.

PART V: CONCLUSION.

17. Language Selection.

17.1 Criteria.

17.2 Evaluation.

Summary.

Exercises.

18. Language Design.

18.1 Selection of concepts.

18.2 Regularity.

18.3 Simplicity.

18.4 Efficiency.

18.5 Syntax.

18.6 Language life cycles.

18.7 The future.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises.

Bibliography.

Glossary.

Index.

商品描述(中文翻譯)

描述:
程式語言存在的目的是與電腦和人溝通。一個好的語言,就像一個好的數學符號,可以幫助我們更快地表達和傳達想法。然而,有很多程式語言和很多需要理解的特性。

反映了當前趨勢,面向對象(OO)編程已經取代了命令式編程成為主流範式,本書以Java和C++作為主要的範例語言,最突出地展示了面向對象範式。同樣,由於網絡已經改變了計算機行業,對於腳本語言(如Perl和Python)的研究需求也越來越大。本書還包括了其他案例研究語言,包括Python、Haskell、Prolog和Ada,通過研究編程語言的動機而不僅僅是它們的特性,深入研究了編程語言的概念。

所有的程序員,不僅僅是語言專家,都需要對語言概念有深入的理解,以便充分利用這些最基本的工具。本書解釋了支撐所有編程語言的基本概念,並展示了這些概念如何在主要範式中綜合應用:命令式、面向對象、並發、函數、邏輯和腳本。

本書以清晰、易於理解的風格撰寫,非常適合課堂和自學使用,包含了大量的例子、幾個主要編程語言的案例研究以及章末練習題。練習題的樣本解答可在附帶網站上找到。附帶網站:www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/~daw/books/PLDC/

目錄:
前言。
第一部分:介紹。
1. 程式語言。
1.1 程式語言學。
1.1.1 概念和範式。
1.1.2 語法、語義和語用。
1.1.3 語言處理器。
1.2 歷史發展。
總結。
進一步閱讀。
練習題。
第二部分:基本概念。
2. 值和類型。
2.1 類型。
2.2 原始類型。
2.2.1 內建原始類型。
2.2.2 定義的原始類型。
2.2.3 離散原始類型。
2.3 複合類型。
2.3.1 笛卡爾積、結構和記錄。
2.3.2 映射、數組和函數。
2.3.3 不相交聯合、區分記錄和對象