Mathematical and Numerical Modelling of Heterostructure Semiconductor Devices: From Theory to Programming

E.A.B. Cole

  • 出版商: Springer
  • 出版日期: 2009-12-14
  • 售價: $1,350
  • 貴賓價: 9.5$1,283
  • 語言: 英文
  • 頁數: 406
  • 裝訂: Paperback
  • ISBN: 1848829361
  • ISBN-13: 9781848829367

立即出貨 (庫存=1)

商品描述

<內容簡介>

The commercial development of novel semiconductor devices requires that their properties be examined as thoroughly and rapidly as possible. These properties are investigated by obtaining numerical solutions of the highly nonlinear coupled set of equations which govern their behaviour. In particular, the existence of interfaces between different material layers in heterostructures means that quantum solutions must be found in the quantum wells which are formed at these interfaces.

This book presents some of the mathematical and numerical techniques associated with the investigation. It begins with introductions to quantum and statistical mechanics. Later chapters then cover finite differences; multigrids; upwinding techniques; simulated annealing; mesh generation; and the reading of computer code in C++; these chapters are self-contained, and do not rely on the reader having met these topics before. The author explains how the methods can be adapted to the specific needs of device modelling, the advantages and disadvantages of each method, the pitfalls to avoid, and practical hints and tips for successful implementation. Sections of computer code are included to illustrate the methods used.

Written for anyone who is interested in learning about, or refreshing their knowledge of, some of the basic mathematical and numerical methods involved in device modelling, this book is suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate students, lecturers and researchers working in the fields of electrical engineering and semiconductor device physics, and for students of other mathematical and physical disciplines starting out in device modelling.


 <章節目錄>

Part I Overview and physical equations
1 Overview of device modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.1 Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.2 Physical theory and modelling equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.2.1 Physical theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.2.2 Modelling equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
1.3 Mathematical and numerical techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
1.4 What is in this book, and its limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
2 Quantum mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2.1 The physical basis of quantum mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
2.2 The Schrodinger equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
2.2.1 Derivation of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation . . . . 24
2.2.2 The time-independent Schrodinger equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
2.3 Boundary and continuity conditions, and parity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
2.3.1 Boundary and continuity conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
2.3.2 Parity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
2.4 The probability current density . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
2.5 One dimensional motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
2.5.1 General considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
2.5.2 Reflection and Transmission coefficients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
2.5.3 Single finite step forE < V0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
2.5.4 Infinite barrier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2.5.5 Infinite square well . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2.5.6 Finite square well . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
2.5.7 δ-function potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
2.5.8 Square potential barrier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
2.5.9 The sech2 potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
2.6 Operators and observables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
2.7 The Uncertainty Principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
2.8 The postulates of quantum mechanics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
2.9 The harmonic oscillator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
2.9.1 Solution of the differential equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
2.9.2 The ladder operator method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
2.9.3 Oscillations in more than one dimension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
2.9.4 The displaced harmonic oscillator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
2.10 Spherically symmetric potentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
2.10.1 The Schrodinger equation in spherical polar coordinates . . . . 64
2.10.2 Solution of the angular components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
2.10.3 Angular momentum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
2.10.4 The hydrogen atom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
2.11 Angular momentum and spin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
2.11.1 The necessity for extra energy levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
2.11.2 Generalised angular momentum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
2.11.3 Particles with spin 12
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
2.11.4 Energy splitting using spin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
2.12 Systems of identical particles: BE and FD statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
2.12.1 Symmetric and antisymmetric wave functions . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
2.12.2 The Pauli exclusion principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
2.12.3 Non-interacting identical particles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
2.13 The Schrodinger equation in device modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
3 Equilibrium thermodynamics and statistical mechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
3.1 The scope and laws of thermodynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
3.1.1 The Zeroth Law of thermodynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
3.1.2 The First Law of thermodynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
3.1.3 The Second Law of thermodynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
3.1.4 Properties of the thermodynamic entropy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
3.2 The statistical entropy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
3.3 Maximisation of entropy subject to constraints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
3.4 The distributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
3.4.1 The Canonical distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
3.4.2 The Grand Canonical distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
3.4.3 The Microcanonical distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
3.5 Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108
3.6 The continuous approximation and the Ideal Quantum Gas . . . . . . . . 109
Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
4 Density of states and applications—1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
4.1 Electron number and energy densities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
4.1.1 Density of states—general . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
4.1.2 Density of states—particles free in three dimensions . . . . . . . 117
4.1.3 Density of states—particles free in two dimensions . . . . . . . . 119
4.1.4 Density of states—particles free in one dimension . . . . . . . . . 120
4.2 Blackbody radiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
4.3 Classical aspects of specific heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
4.3.1 The Equipartition of Energy theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
4.3.2 Examples on the Equipartition of Energy theorem . . . . . . . . . 125
4.4 Quantum aspects of specific heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
4.4.1 Quantum vibrational aspects: the Einstein solid . . . . . . . . . . . 127
4.4.2 Quantum rotational aspects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
4.4.3 Schottky peaks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
4.5 Bose-Einstein condensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
4.6 Thermionic emission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
4.7 Semiconductor statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
4.7.1 Allowed and forbidden bands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
4.7.2 The effectivemass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
4.7.3 Electron and hole densities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
4.7.4 The non-degenerate approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
5 Density of states and applications—2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
5.1 Periodic potential: the Bloch theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
5.2 Heterostructures: position-dependent mass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
5.3 Heterostructures: the effective mass approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
5.4 Quantum wells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
5.4.1 The general structure of a quantum well . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
5.4.2 Density of states in quantum wells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
5.4.3 Quantum wells—particles free in two dimensions . . . . . . . . . 156
5.4.4 Quantum wells—particles free in one dimension . . . . . . . . . . 157
Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
6 The transport equations and the device equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
6.1 The Boltzmann transport equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
6.1.1 Derivation of the BTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
6.1.2 The relaxation-time approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
6.2 Themoments of the BTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
6.2.1 The general moment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
6.2.2 First moment: carrier concentration equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
6.2.3 Second moment: momentum conservation equation . . . . . . . 167
6.2.4 Third moment: energy transport equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
6.3 Models based on the BTE moments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
6.3.1 The Poisson equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
6.3.2 The simplified energy transport model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
6.3.3 The drift-diffusion model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
6.4 The Wigner distribution function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
6.4.1 Definition of the Wigner function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
6.4.2 Properties of the Wigner function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
6.5 The Wigner transport equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
6.5.1 Derivation of the Wigner equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
6.5.2 Special cases of the Wigner equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177
6.5.3 Moments of the Wigner equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
6.6 Description of a typical device. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
6.7 Material properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
6.7.1 GaAs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
6.7.2 AlGaAs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
6.7.3 InGaAs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
6.7.4 The electron mobility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
6.8 The Schrodinger equation applied to the HEMT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
6.9 The overall nature of the modelling equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Part II Mathematical and numerical methods
7 Basic approximation and numerical methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
7.1 Reading the C programmes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
7.2 Finite differences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
7.2.1 Description of themesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
7.2.2 Numerical differentiation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
7.2.3 Numerical integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
7.2.4 Discretisation of the Poisson and Schrodinger equations . . . . 198
7.3 Solution of simultaneous equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
7.3.1 Linear equations: direct method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
7.3.2 Linear equations: relaxation method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
7.3.3 The Newton method: a brief introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206
7.4 Time discretisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
7.4.1 Explicit and implicit schemes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
7.4.2 The ADImethod. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211
7.5 Function updating and fitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
7.5.1 Updating due to altered boundary conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213
7.5.2 Discretising mixed boundary conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
7.5.3 Modelling abrupt junctions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217
Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218
8 Fermi and associated integrals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
8.1 Definition of the Fermi integrals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221
8.1.1 The standard Fermi integrals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
8.1.2 The associated Fermi integrals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222
8.2 Approximation of the associated integrals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223
8.3 Implementation of the approximation scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225
8.3.1 Method of implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225
8.3.2 Results of the implementation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226
8.3.3 Improvements to the scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
8.4 Calculation of the standard Fermi integrals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227
Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
9 The upwinding method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
9.1 Description of the upwinding approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
9.2 Upwinding applied to device equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230
9.3 Upwinding in terms of the C-function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
9.3.1 Definition of the C-function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233
9.3.2 Properties of the C-function and related functions . . . . . . . . . 234
9.4 Upwinding using the C-function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237
9.5 Numerical diffusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239
9.6 The limit of uniformtemperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243
Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
10 Solution of equations: the Newton and reduced method . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
10.1 The Newtonmethod for one variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247
10.2 Error analysis of the Newton method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249
10.3 The multi-variable Newton method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251
10.4 The reduced Newton method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253
10.5 The Newton method applied to device modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254
10.5.1 The reduced method applied to device modelling . . . . . . . . . . 254
10.5.2 Example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257
11 Solution of equations: the phaseplane method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
11.1 The basis of the phaseplane method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
11.2 The phaseplane method for one variable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
11.3 Discretisation of the equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261
11.4 The condition for a stable solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
11.5 Exact correspondence between the differential and discretised
equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265
11.6 A one-variable example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
11.7 The phaseplane equations for several variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267
11.8 Connection with the Newton and SOR/SUR schemes . . . . . . . . . . . . 270
11.9 Error analysis of the phase plane method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
11.9.1 One-variable case using exact derivatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271
11.9.2 One-variable case using central difference derivatives . . . . . . 272
11.9.3 Multi-variable case using exact derivatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272
11.9.4 Multi-variable case using central difference derivatives . . . . . 275
11.9.5 Multi-variable case using forward difference derivatives . . . . 276
11.10 The phaseplane method applied to device modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277
11.11 Case study: a four-layer four-contact HEMT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281
12 Solution of equations: the multigrid method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
12.1 Description of the multigrid method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283
12.2 Moving between grids: restriction and prolongation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286
12.3 Implementation of the multigrid method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287
12.4 Efficiency of the multigrid scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290
12.5 Multigrids applied to device modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292
12.5.1 Case study 1: application to a one-dimensional device . . . . . 293
12.5.2 Case study 2: application to a two-dimensional device . . . . . 299
13 Approximate and numerical solutions of the Schrodinger equation . . 303
13.1 The WKB approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
13.1.1 The basis of theWKB method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
13.1.2 The limit of the approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
13.1.3 The connection formulae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
13.1.4 Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
13.2 Time independent perturbation theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
13.2.1 The first order non-degenerate case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314
13.2.2 The second order non-degenerate case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
13.2.3 The degenerate case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
13.2.4 Example: linear perturbation to the harmonic oscillator . . . . 316
13.3 Time dependent perturbation theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
13.4 The Variational Principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
13.5 Discretisation of the Schrodinger equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322
13.5.1 Discretisation in two dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323
13.5.2 Discretisation in one dimension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324
13.6 Numerical solution: the iteration method. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325
13.6.1 The basis of the iterationmethod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325
13.6.2 Numerical implementation of the iteration method . . . . . . . . 326
13.7 Numerical solution: the trial function method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328
13.7.1 The basis of the trial function method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
13.7.2 Choice of trial functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333
13.7.3 Numerical implementation of the trial function method . . . . 333
13.8 Numerical solution: the matrix method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336
14 Genetic algorithms and simulated annealing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339
14.1 How genetic algorithms work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340
14.2 Chromosome representation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343
14.3 The genetic operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345
14.3.1 Stage 1: Roulette wheel selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346
14.3.2 Stage 2: Crossover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348
14.3.3 Stage 3:Mutation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
14.4 The multivariable and multifunction cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351
14.4.1 Themultivariable case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
14.4.2 The multifunction case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
14.4.3 Example: maximising a function of two variables . . . . . . . . . 354
14.5 Refinements to the GA approach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
14.5.1 Differentialmutation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
14.5.2 Contractive mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356
14.5.3 Range refinement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358
14.6 Simulated annealing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358
14.6.1 How simulated annealing works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 359
14.6.2 Acceptance function based on MB statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362
14.6.3 Acceptance function based on Tsallis statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . 363
14.6.4 Acceptance function based on BE statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365
14.6.5 The cooling schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368
14.7 Application: approximation to the Associated Fermi integrals . . . . . 372
14.7.1 Approximationmethod . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372
14.7.2 Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374
15 Grid generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377
15.1 Overview of grid generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378
15.2 Functions of a grid generation programme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379
15.3 Results from the programme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385
A The theory of contractive mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401